9.9.10

Uruguay Residency - Supplement for US Citizens

Uruguay residency criminal background report for US citizens

 If you are a US citizen applying for Uruguay residency, you need to get a Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) report instead of a police certificate from your home country. The application for the FBI report is made in Uruguay from the Uruguay Interpol Office.

A reservation is required for an appointment. You need to let them know that you are making a request for a FBI report for the purposes of obtaining permanent Uruguay residency.

Uruguay Interpol Office
Maldonado 1109
Montevideo
(02) 900-5921
 
When you arrive for your appointment you will need to have:
1) Your last address in the US
2) Your social security number
3) Your address in Uruguay
4) Your passport
5) A check made out to the US Treasury for 18 US dollars.

Tip: You can purchase a cashiers-type check no to far from the Interpole Office at Cambio Gales on the corner of 18th de Julio and Rio Grand in Montevideo’s Centro.

The Interpol officer will present paperwork for you to complete and take two sets of fingerprints of all fingers
The Interpol officer puts the applical forms, one set of fingerprints, and the check in an official envelope and seals it. The envelope I received had two addresses. One printed and a white affixed label.

The envelope needs to be mailed to the FBI by Federal Express or DHL, and a copy of the mailing receipt delivered back to the Interpol officer to prove the date the envelope was sent.

There is a DHL office in Centro at Rio Negro 1329 Local 24 just off of Av. 18 de Julio. In my case it was over 60 US dollars.

The Gales and DHL office cited are close to the Interpol office and familiar with the procedure.
The FBI results are reported to the Interpol office in Uruguay electronically. At the time I made the application it was taking 60 days. The applications are referenced by the date you made your application. After 60 days you can call to learn if your results have been received.

Uruguay Interpol then gives the FBI report directly to the Uruguayan immigration authority.

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